Fujifilm instax mini 9 review youtube

Instant film cameras are fun little toys to have around. The company hopes to turn things around with its latest model, called the Instax Mini 9. It has an improved design, and what better way to target millennials and the teenagers of today than with the addition of a selfie mirror?

For Rs. It retails for about Rs. The new camera is available in funky pastel shades, and what we have the Lime Green one with us today. Around the back, we have a little compartment for the film cartridge, an optical viewfinder, and a counter which shows you the number of unused film sheets remaining.

The slot from where the processed film is ejected is on the top. In the front, we have the flash and light metering sensors which automatically adjust the exposure. The rest of the time, the camera will automatically determine the best exposure and switch to it, which is indicated by the different LEDs around the dial lighting up.

The Instax Mini 9's instant film sheets give you 62 x 46cm photos. The way this works is that each film sheet contains chemicals in little pouch at the bottom, and when it is exposed to light, the chemicals are pushed into the frame with the help of rollers, as it is ejected from the camera.

The film pops out only a few seconds after you press the shutter button, but it then takes about two minutes for it to develop fully. Just like with traditional Polaroids, you can personalise the white frames with messages, drawings, etc. The flash always fires, no matter the light conditions. The close-up lens clips onto the front of the main lens and lets you shoot objects as close as a foot away from the lens.

The final output is printed onto the film sheets, and that's that. The camera is comfortable to hold and light enough for one-handed use. With each new cartridge, the first tune you press the shutter button, the protective sheet will be ejected, after which actual film sheets will be used.

We found many overexposed areas in outdoor shots taken in daylight, resulting in washed-out details. In a well-lit room, we managed to get fairly detailed close-ups with the attached lens. It's also important to note that the Instax Mini 9 works best for close-ups and doesn't fare too well with subjects at a distance. Just like the overexposure issue when shooting in bright daylight, some of the shots we took indoors had a soft focus.

However, it isn't suitable for close-ups as the bright flash will overexpose your subject. You have to learn the balance, but that means you wind up wasting quite a lot of film sheets, which are not exactly cheap.

A pack of 20 film sheets costs around Rs. Do remember that these films have an expiry date. It's a reminder of a simpler time when we didn't have the luxury of taking hundreds of shots in one go, since every one has to count. Plus, the ability to have these physical photographs in your wallet with you has its appeal. Using it on a daily basis won't be very economical, as we're looking at a cost of at least Rs.

Also, details, clarity and exposure in photos are always a bit hit-or-miss. This comes with the territory of instant cameras, so if you like the idea of photos having varied Instagram-like filters to them, then you'll be happy with it. For the latest videos on gadgets and tech, subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Fujifilm Instax Mini 9 Review. The Instax Mini 9 features a selfie mirror on the front The camera is available in different colour options The Fujifilm Instax Mini 9 is priced at Rs. He is the Deputy Editor Reviews at Gadgets If you buy something using links in our stories, we may earn a commission.

This helps support our journalism. Learn more. I'm a huge fan of physical pictures, especially when you can get them seconds after pressing the shutter.

They enthrall children and have even found an audience with pros. Polaroids also have that nostalgic appeal for those of us of a certain age, but the newer crop of instant cameras and printers use updated tech. For several years, Fujifilm's Instax cameras have been mining our s Polaroid nostalgia using similar emulsion and dye sandwich prints. Instax prints are thinner and smaller, but they have the same white border Polaroids had because the border holds dye, which is released when the print is pushed out of the camera.

They're an evolution of the shake-'em-up, fade-in images of your youth. Lately, there's a new crop of cameras boasting a different kind of tech, and they're aiming to out-print Instax. Canon's new Ivy Cliq camera is one of them. The Cliq uses a technology called Zinkwhich is shorthand for "zero ink.

In keeping with the legacy of Polaroids, Canon's Cliq is not going to churn out museum-quality, crystal-clear prints. Still, it's undeniably fun to use and the results will likely be good enough for many people.

If you're looking for an easy way to share those selfies or group portraits in the real world, the Cliq delivers. As a bonus, Zink images are also stickers. The Cliq nails many of the elements that make instant cameras so fun. It's super simple. There's no focusing, no worrying about exposure. You aim. You fire. You print. The Cliq comes in red, blue, or yellow. It's slightly thicker than a deck of cards and small enough to squeeze into most pockets.

It's a little tight in the pocket of your jeans, but considering that it's a printer inside a camera, it's remarkably compact. There's not much else to the Cliq. It's a very simple device, you press the shutter button and about 30 seconds later your image prints, end of story.

It has no screen, no preview—not much in the way of options at all. There is a mirror next to lens to help you frame selfies, but on the back there are just two buttons: one to choose your image dimensions either 2 x 3 or 2 x 2 inches and one to reprint the last image, which is handy when you're sharing photos with friends. The Cliq holds 10 Zink papers and the refill packs are small enough that you can throw a few in your pocket and you won't even notice them.

instax mini 9

It does optionally store your images to a MicroSD card 64 GB max, like this one so you can download and edit them using the desktop software of your choice. Just know that the Cliq has a 5-megapixel camera so they're not the kind of photos you can blow up bigger than 2 x 3 inches. If you bought your phone in the last few years, it likely captures better images than the Cliq. There's one big gotcha to be aware of: You can't take pictures without printing.If you buy something using links in our stories, we may earn a commission.

This helps support our journalism. Learn more. Despite the naysayers, print film refuses to die. Kodak resurrected one of it's most popular films, Ektachromeand Fujifilm has announced it will bring back Acrosa popular black-and-white film.

It's not just pros and artists that crave real-world prints though; instant-print cameras and printers have been piling up on our desk all year. Smaller Zink cameras and printers are among them, and they're nipping at Fujifilm's heels. Using the same credit-card-sized Instax film as previous releases, like our favorite Instaxthe Mini 90, the LiPlay offers a more pocketable form factor.

It also has a glass lens and is an impressive stand-alone mini printer. With an app, you can print photos from your smartphone. The much-touted ability to embed audio in your images using a QR code is less impressive, but I'll get to that later. The LiPlay is a hybrid. Unlike most other Instax cameras, you can review your images on an LCD screen and decide whether or not to print them.

This puts an end to wasting film on images where someone's eyes are closed. This alone could mean a considerable long-term savings over direct-to-print models like the Mini That said, my favorite feature of the LCD isn't the ability to review so much as the animation that happens when you print: It scrolls your image up off the screen at almost exactly the same speed the actual print emerges from the camera.

It's a nice touch that makes that digital-to-real-world transition more immediate and fun. The images the LiPlay printed out were impressively sharp, better than the results I got from the Mini The LiPlay lacks some of the extra features found on Fujifilm's other Instax models. For example, there's no double exposure or close-up mode. Thankfully, there's still a way to set exposure compensation. Instax prints have a tendency to crush blacks and wash out highlights, so I often use exposure compensation to lighten shadows or darken highlights, depending on the scene I'm shooting.

The rounded body of the LiPlay is easy to hold and reasonably pocketable. It comes in black, white, and rose gold. The design is clean and simple. There's a power button on the side of the camera, and next to it are three buttons that control which visual effects if any are applied to the image.

The options range from hearts to antlers to a dozen or so other overlays.

fujifilm instax mini 9 review youtube

A Set button inside a typical camera 4-way direction wheel rounds out the controls on the back. The wheel lets you navigate the menus to turn Bluetooth on and off, control various print settings, and toggle other settings.

In front is a shutter release along with a selfie mirror, AF lamp, and the button to record audio. Yes, the Instax Mini LiPlay records audio, which at first brush sounds really cool, conjuring up visions of photos out of Harry Potter. Unfortunately, in practice it involves scanning QR codes and installing smartphone apps.

You take an image, record up to 10 seconds of audio, and then print the image with a QR code. You then give that image to someone else, and they can scan the code and listen to your message.

The process works, but it's a cumbersome way add sound to prints. The new app doesn't just play QR code audio; it also controls the LiPlay. You can set the effects for the three shortcut buttons and trigger the shutter for group photos, complete with a live view.It doesn't look all that different from the outgoing Mini 9, but Fujifilm's latest instant camera is also its best.

Auto exposure and a variable shutter speed help it take better pictures and avoid wasting shots, while the adjustable lens makes all kinds of close-up photography possible — not just selfies. If you're just getting started with instant film, there's no better place to start.

Newcomers to instant photography have been well served by Fujifilm's Instax Mini 9, which has long been our go-to budget choice. It was affordable, easy to use, and packs of film weren't too pricey either. It wasn't perfect, though.

You had to manually adjust the exposure for different lighting situations, which was easy to forget, and the lens needed a clip-on attachment if you wanted your selfies to be in focus.

Fuji has refined the formula with the Instax Mini 11, adding an auto exposure system with variable shutter speed, and an adjustable lens barrel for close-ups. This makes it the ideal starter camera for anyone looking to try instant photography for the first time, or to liven up parties and events with fun, spur-of-the-moment snaps that can be shared right away. The low price even puts it in gift territory. The Fujifilm Instax Mini 11 still uses packs of Fuji's credit card-sized Instax Mini film, which is some of the most affordable instant film around.

Fujifilm Instax Mini 9 Camera Unboxing and First Look -Instant Camera

Each pack holds ten 54 x 86mm shots, which have a rectangular 46 x 62mm 2. Multipacks of various sizes can also bring the price down even further. There's a clear family resemblance between the Fujifilm Instax Mini 11 and its predecessor, the Mini 9. The new camera shares the same rounded, almost bubble-like appearance, and is still made from matte plastic. It's a little slimmer now, though still not quite pocket-sized. Fuji's more advanced Mini LiPlay is still the most portable Instax around, but it costs more than twice as much.

The front grip is narrower, and there's now a ridged thumb grip on the rear for easier one-handed use. Beyond the lens barrel release, which also acts as a power on switch for the built-in flash, the only other button is the shutter release. There's no way to disable the flash, no self timer, and no tripod thread on the bottom. This is about as simple as instant cameras get. Film packs are loaded via a flip-down door on the rear, with the viewfinder shifted to the far right side.

A tiny counter ticks down your remaining shots, so you don't accidentally open the film door and waste a half-finished pack. The Mini 9 wasn't afraid of bright colors, and the Mini 11 has followed suit, though it sticks with pastel hues for a more subtle effect. Fuji also includes two stick-on rubber buttons that make the shutter button that little bit easier to find blind, but the diamond effect finish is a little blingy and won't be to all tastes. Push the lens barrel release and it extrudes using a spring mechanism, with the built-in flash activating automatically.

Fujifilm Instax Mini 9 Review

Like the Mini 9, it uses two AA batteries, which are much easier to come by than the CR2 batteries that power some of Fuji's other instant cameras. Battery life is typically around ten packs of film, or shots, so more than enough for a day of shooting. There's no way to manually disable the flash, which fires automatically with every shot — whether it's really needed or not.

It may be off center, but the Mini 11's viewfinder gives a good representation of what the lens will capture. If something appears to fit within the frame, it should appear once the print develops.The Instax SQ1 makes Fuji's square format instant cameras even more affordable, at the expense of features.

That makes it ideal for snapping away without thinking about shooting modes, but creatives may miss the versatility of the pricier SQ6. The Fujifilm Instax SQ1 is a new middle ground in its instant camera range. The best place to start with Instax has traditionally been the Fujifilm Instax Mini 11 or Instax Mini 9 predecessorits simplest and most affordable model. The downside? Those cameras limit you to Instax Mini film — and while their rectangular photos are fun, the more expensive Fujifilm Instax SQ6 and its Instax Square film offer the more authentic retro experience.

The Instax SQ1 offers a blend of the two experiences, combining the ease of use of Fuji's more basic models including the handy auto exposure system introduced on the Instax Mini 11 with larger, square format film. Each 86x72mm 3. Previously Instax Square was only available as color film, but now Fuji finally offers a monochrome option. Colorful Rainbow frame packs complete the expanded line-up. The Instax SQ1 bears more than a passing resemblance to the pricier SQ6, with square dimensions dominated by the large lens barrel.

It's just as sizable, with no way you'd fit one in a pocket, so it's nice to see a wrist strap bundled in the box. The SQ1 is built entirely from matte plastic, which helps cut down on costs, but has a decent heft to it once loaded with film and batteries.

CR2 batteries are more expensive than AAs, but only need replacing every ten or so packs of film. Functionality is stripped back completely, the twisting lens barrel both turning on the camera and automatically activating the flash. There's no way to disable it. Twisting further switches from regular to close-up shooting, which is largely for selfies — there's even a tiny mirror built into the lens barrel for composition. The only other button is the shutter release, which is built into the chunky grip on the right side just below the viewfinder.

This camera is very much designed for right-handed use. A flip-down door at the rear holds the film pack, with a small counter in the grip showing how many shots you have left so you don't waste a half-finished pack by accidentally opening the door too soon. Prints are ejected out the top of the camera, and can take around three to ten minutes to fully develop — slightly faster than Polaroid's physically larger I-Type film.

The Instax SQ1's viewfinder sits off-centre, but still gives a good representation of what the lens sees, and the new auto exposure system ensures fewer snaps are washed-out or over-exposed. This was all too common in the Instax Mini 9, but here even tricky lighting conditions produced usable shots.

The way the automatic flash helps balance out indoor scenes is on par with the Instax Mini 11 — only here you're getting a significantly larger print thanks to the square format film. You'll still notice overblown highlights in some of our sample images, but this is largely a characteristic of the film. Instax usually delivers pastel-like colors mixed with dark shadows, albeit in a more true-to-life manner than some rival film formats, and that is very much the case here.

fujifilm instax mini 9 review youtube

The fixed focus lens makes the SQ1 best suited to portraits and middle-distance subjects, with landscapes appearing far softer. The camera offers no visual clue you're shooting in selfie mode from the rear, either, so it's important to remember to twist the lens back. Otherwise longer-distance snaps will appear even more blurry and out-of-focus. By making larger format instant film more readily available to those looking to get started with the medium, the Instax SQ1 gives beginners greater choice when it comes to choosing their first camera.This website uses cookies.

By using the site you are agreeing to our Privacy Policy. Fujifilm is helping make the world a better, healthier, and more interesting place. Setting the brightness adjustment dial to the high-key mode mark allows you to take pictures with a softer impression. Turn the brightness adjustment dial to the position mark of the lit lamp. Forward Looking Stories Fujifilm innovation has always driven the company forward. Technologies A technology company, Fujifilm is engaged in a wide variety of endeavors.

Achievements The history of Fujifilm is a history of valuable innovation. Open Innovation Fujifilm's open innovation is about listening to the customer and innovating together. Business Products Medical Systems Index. Sustainability Report. About Us. Features Specifications. Ice Blue. Flamingo Pink. Lime Green. Smoky White. You can check your framing with the mirror next to the lens.

Close-up shooting up to 35 cm away is possible. Note Actual product colors may differ from colors shown on your monitor. Power Supply Two AA-size 1. Note Specifications are subject to change without notice. Related Documents. Related Products.

News Feed. Fujifilm Corporation is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Fujifilm Holdings Corporation. Fujifilm Holdings Corporation Investor Relations. Constant firing flash automatic light adjustment Recycle time: 0. Two AA-size 1.Fujifilm is helping make the world a better, healthier, and more interesting place. Setting the brightness adjustment dial to the high-key mode mark allows you to take pictures with a softer impression.

You have plenty of options for purchasing an instax mini 9! Its available online and in-store at these, and other fine retailers.

Click below for availability. Forward Looking Stories Fujifilm innovation has always driven the company forward. Technologies A technology company, Fujifilm is engaged in a wide variety of endeavors. Achievements The history of Fujifilm is a history of valuable innovation. Open Innovation Fujifilm's open innovation is about listening to the customer and innovating together. Data Storage. About Fujifilm.

fujifilm instax mini 9 review youtube

Press Center. Features Specifications Where to Buy. Ice Blue. Flamingo Pink. Lime Green. Smoky White. You can check your framing with the mirror next to the lens. Close-up shooting up to 35 cm away is possible. Note Actual product colors may differ from colors shown on your monitor. Power Supply Two AA-size 1. Note Specifications are subject to change without notice.

Get on this instant! Social Media. Facebook Instagram Twitter Pinterest. Constant firing flash automatic light adjustment Recycle time: 0. Two AA-size 1.


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